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B This Is Reggae Music [Island, 1974] Unlike The Harder They Come, which collected the best songs of artists whose music was either unavailable or not rich enough to fill an LP, this sampler serves no function.The two cuts from the Wailers are not their top work, and a Maytals album that includes both should be available here soon.

"I left out how boring it was." And though you can be sure it's not like being there, this three-record set does capture that.

A- The Outlaws [RCA Victor, 1976] No truth-in-packaging awards here--you'd never know from the label that most of this has been heard before in other configurations--but how about a cheer-and-a-half for the programming?

Me, I often find Waylon and Willie (and Tompall and Jessi) a little tedious over a whole side. B Disco-Trek [Atlantic, 1976] You can't deny that disco gets more music out there.

It includes a couple of acceptable sleepers I'd never even heard and some long-lost esoterica by the Turbans and Lee Allen, not to mention the Five Satins, the Channels, and the Nutmegs. A Africa Dances [Authentic, 1973] What The Harder They Come does for reggae this sampler attempts to do for the American-influenced urban music of Africa.

Its scope is necessarily broad, but only once does an alien-sounding rhythm (Arabic tarabu) interfere with its remarkable listenability.

As is inevitable in a live album featuring stage announcements, crowd noises, and sixteen different artists, not one side is enjoyable straight through: CSNY are stiff and atrociously flat in their second gig, Paul Butterfield sounds wasted, Sha Na Na should never record, Joan Baez should never record, and so forth.

But a substantial proportion of this music sounds pretty good, and three performances belong to history: Ten Years After's "I'm Going Home" (speed kills), Joe Cocker's "With a Little Help From My Friends" (mad Englishman), and Jimi Hendrix's "Star Spangled Banner" (wotta ham).The mood might be described as folk music with brass, for although the horn techniques are familiar from big-band jazz, r&b, and especially salsa, the overall effect is much less biting than that would imply.There's something penetratingly decent, humorous, and even civil about this music, as if the equanimity of tribal cultures at peace at least with themselves has not yet been overwhelmed by media-nourished crosscultural complexities.B The Naked Carmen [Mercury, 1970] The aptest instance of overpretension in the history of rock-is-art. This live sequel is a solid sampler, blues one step closer to jazz than Muddy Waters or B. Thomas is something of a ringer, but he certainly sounds a lot more earthbound here than with Pharoah Sanders.It makes more sense to do a rock/pop take-off on a vulgar work in a vulgar genre than to collaborate on derivative moderne with Zubin Mehta (the Mothers) or stick your amps in front of a notoriously venal symphony orchestra (Deep Purple). Recommended to blues fanatics, blues novices, and anyone lucky enough to find it in a bargain bin.If this is my misapprehension, perhaps it is reinforced by the fact that the lyrics aren't in English, although I don't get anything similar from salsa. A June 1, 1974 [Island, 1974] The highlights of a concert organized by genial eccentric Kevin Ayers (ex-Soft Machine, but he got out when the getting was good), this offers one side of Ayers's genially eccentric songs and one of Eno singing Eno songs at full volume (note demonic cackle) and John Cale singing an Elvis Presley song at full volume (note lupine howl).